Immediate Lift Of Corned Beef Ban

Immediate lifting of the temporary ban that was on the imported corned beef from Brazil to Jamaica

Immediate lifting of the temporary ban that was on the imported corned beef from Brazil to Jamaica announced Health Minister Karl Samuda yesterday April 4, 2017.

Immediate lifting of the temporary ban that was on the imported corned beef from Brazil to Jamaica

Corned beef, the oxtail of tin foods for most Jamaicans was banned by the Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Karl Samuda on March 20, 2017. The ban was imposed on corned beef after reports surfaced that authorities from Brazil released information that several major Brazilian meat processors had been selling rotten beef and poultry. Minister Karl Samuda then urged consumers not to purchase corned beef made in Brazil, and distributors should withdraw the corned beef from their shelves.


At a press briefing on Monday, April 4, 2017, Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries Karl Samuda made the announcement that the temporary ban imposed on corned beef have been lifted. Minister Karl Samuda made the decision to lift the ban after having discussions with stakeholders in the industry.

The Minister had the following to say;


That means that all imports en route, all stocks of corned beef that were quarantined, all stocks of corned beef in warehouses on the wharf, or elsewhere, destined for distribution across the country can now be released for distribution.


Jamaica imports 99.5 percent of the corned beef on the local market from Brazil.

Minister Karl Samuda further added that teams from the ministry, as well as the Health Ministry, visited two plants in Brazil where most of the corned beef destined for Jamaica is manufactured, on March 29 to April 2, 2017. The team’s investigation found that the plants were in compliance with the necessary standards.

In specific terms, factory number 337 and 226 were found to be in compliance with the international and quality safety standards. All the phytosanitary and other measures required to ensure safety in the consumption of the product manufactured were within the required standards.


The decision to lift the ban came as a result of local testing carried out by the Bureau of Standards Jamaica (BSJ) and the Veterinarian Services of the ministry, which found the product to be uncontaminated or “within normal limits;” indicated Minister Karl Samuda.

Minister Karl Samuda concluded by stating that the ministry will continue to monitor the situation.

Read more about his story in the Jamaica Observer


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