A Comeback Or A Throwback For DJ Spragga Benz?

Spragga Benz rocked the airwaves with his various hits in the 90’s, but can the DJ achieve that feat a second time?

Di di gal dem waant di
Long preformer
Strong Preformer


Hunting, hunting, hunting
Haffi find something, something, something

The lyrics from two of Spragga Benz hit singles in the 90’s. Is Spragga Benz the long performer or is he just hunting something to do since his last album was in 2010?

Spragga Benz was a household name in the 90’s when it comes to dancehall music, but he also had a brief career in the world of film.


“Shottas” dubbed one of the best movies that came out of Jamaica. A movie that once watched, you will instantly, fall in love with the characters, and the storyline; because it speaks the reality of the Jamaican people from start to finish. The infamous character,  “Wayne” which was well played by DJ Spragga Benz, fully captured the life of a notorious Jamaican gangster. Shottas was also co-starred by Ky-Mani Marley as “Biggs,” and Pual Campbell as “Mad Max”

Tragedy struck for Spragga Benz in 2008 when he lost his son, Carlton ‘Carlyle’ Grant Jr, due to a shooting incident. Spragga Benz has since used the death of his son as a source of inspiration. This is what Spragga Benz said about the death of his son:

My son dying has been more of an inspiration rather than a negative.


Every year since his death I have released at least one track dedicated to Carlyle.

Songs such as Shotta Culture was done in his memory.

So I have pulled the positives from this experience.

Spragga Benz is the owner and the driving force behind his label “Red Square,” which he uses to produce young artiste.

You supposed to see my crew nah flee
And all di wanna be’s wanna be just like we
Yu supposed to hear my crew don’t care


 Cho….
Cause wi nuh like
Hypocrites and parasites
and wi nuh like

Speaking about his brand of dancehall music, and also, his response to politicians claim that dancehall music influences crime and violence, Spragga Benz certainly, lived up to the above words from his hit singles “U Suppose To Know,” and“Wi No Like,”   when he said;

“My type and brand of dancehall music must have substance along with ‘danceability’ and ‘listenability’, and most of the music I was hearing lacked di substance I was looking for. It was just all about sex or dancing or shooting, and there was just something missing. I am really proud of this work as well as what I am doing with di youths from Red Square. I always have new music. I just completed some work with Sting International, so when I am ready I am sure we put together 11 or so strong tracks for an album, but that is not in my immediate plan.”

“Politicians, a look a scapegoat and point out di usual suspects in order to cover their shortcomings. Is a whole heap a tings influence di crime and violence, and mi never hear somebody saying, ‘mi jus listen to some music and mi a go rob a man’ is more ‘mi hungry’ or something like dat which cause a man to turn to crime and violence. Music, especially reggae and dancehall, is a means of release. It gives a voice to these same youths to release pent-up tensions. I never hear it influence anybody to go and do stupidness.”

Spragga Benz is also calling on the government to support programmes, which are aimed towards assisting young men who might be involved in criminal activities to find a better way of life.

Government finds money to spend on other things, but we really need social programmes as these youths have no hope. Ingenious ways have to be found to create opportunities for them or they will always be pointing a finger,” he reasoned.

“A Just We and The Threat”  is Spragga Benz newest hit single, which is gaining momentum.  Spragga Benz song, “A Just We and The Threat,” can be found on iTunes/Apple Music and various platforms such as Amazon.

Spragga Benz never really left the dancehall scene, in fact, this is what the DJ had to say:

I was never really gone, but mi just never inna dat vibe to produce my type an’ brand of music.

 

Read more about this story in the Jamaica Observer


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